Indian tribes and Alaskan native villages, entitlements.
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Indian tribes and Alaskan native villages, entitlements. by United States. Office of Revenue Sharing.

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Published by U.S. Treasury Dept., Office of Revenue Sharing in [Washington] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Intergovernmental fiscal relations -- United States.,
  • Interstate relations -- United States.,
  • Eskimos.,
  • Indians.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesGeneral revenue sharing.
The Physical Object
Paginationv. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15208846M

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Kenaitze Indian Tribe Anchorage Agency Clara Swan, Chairperson P.O. Box Kenai, AK Tel# () ; Ketchikan Indian Corporation Juneau Area Office Christine Collison, President Deermount Ave. Ketchikan, AK Tel# () , Fax# ; King Island Native Community Nome Agency Marilyn Koezlina-Irelan, Chief P.O. Box. The Alaska Indian tribes are organized differently than the Indian tribes in other states. You can read Alaska History to get the background information for the reasons this has happened to the tribes. Note: Thus far only the Iñupiat tribe has information (click on the name). Most of the Alaskan Native Indian communities are organized into. St. George is located on the northeast shore of St. George Island, the southern-most of five islands in the Pribilofs. It lies 47 miles south of St. Paul Island, air miles west of Anchorage and miles northwest of Unalaska. Federally Recognized Tribes and Native Villages () List of Federally Recognized Tribes - Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible To Receive Services From the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Monday, J 83 FR () List of Federally Recognized Tribes - Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible To Receive Services From the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Tuesday, Janu 83 FR

Alaska Indians index. Over 2, articles on native american indian tribes of Alaska, the United States and Canada. Extensive categorization and cross-reference, including by nations, bands, rancheria, pueblo, federally recognized, state recognized, and petitions for recognition, state or providence, and by language group and region of original occupation. With the Alaska Native Reorganization Act, an amendment of the Indian Reorganization Act of , the U.S. government formally recognizes Alaska Natives, as it had American Indian tribes in the earlier legislation. Federal funding will be available to villages if they abandon their traditional forms of government and adopt a city council. Author of PL , Final interstate data & allocations, Indian tribes and Alaskan native villages, entitlements, What is revenue sharing?, Commentary on the audit requirements of the local government fiscal assistance amendments of , Commentary on the audit requirements of the amendments to the State and Local Fiscal Assistance Act, What is general revenue sharing?, 9. Community Development Block Grant (ICDBG) Program for Indian Tribes and Alaska Native Villages. This funding record is inactive. Please see the program website or contact the program sponsor to determine if this program is currently accepting applications or will open again in the future.

There are three major Indian tribes in Alaska and a handful of smaller Indian tribes, which make up one of the three indigenous ethnic groups of Alaska. The other ethnic groups in Alaska are referred to as Eskimos (Inuit in Canada) and Metis. The Athabaskan Indians are the largest tribe in Alaska, with ab members. Assistant Secretary for Public and Indian Housing, Office of Native American Programs (ONAP). B. Funding Opportunity Title: Community Development Block Grant (ICDBG) Program for Indian Tribes and Alaska Native Villages. C. Announcement Type: Initial Announcement. D. Funding Opportunity Number: The funding opportunity number is FRN The federal Indian trust responsibility is also a legally enforceable fiduciary obligation on the part of the United States to protect tribal treaty rights, lands, assets, and resources, as well as a duty to carry out the mandates of federal law with respect to American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and villages. Associations, regional and village corporations. Under ANCSA the state was originally divided into twelve regions, each represented by a "Native association" responsible for the enrollment of past and present residents of the region. Individual Alaska Natives enrolled in these associations, and their village level equivalents, were made shareholder in the Regional and Village Corporations.